by erin stewart -286

How to Make Fire Cider

Today is World Fire Cider Making Day, so we’re joining the herbalists around the world in whipping up a batch of this fiery, stimulating traditional remedy. Ironically, I have a bit of a cold today, so please excuse my dry, scratchy, nasal-toned voice in the video. Apparently I didn’t take my fire cider this season. 😉

Each herbalist tends to take this traditional formula and play with the recipe a bit until it becomes their own, so you’ll find a lot of variations of it in books and on the web. Ingredients tend to vary based on the location of the herbalist and which season it is. You’ll notice that I’ve left out Horseradish root, one of the main ingredients in traditional fire cider, because I was unable to source it organically this year. (We’re a 100% organic household.) No worries – use what you have available!

The main focus of the formula is to create a fiery, sweet immune boosting tonic that can be taken in small amounts when you feel like you might be getting sick or just need a little extra immune support. You can take it straight or add it to soups or salad dressings. Ready to make some of your own?

CLICK ON THE VIDEO BELOW TO PLAY IT

A BIT ABOUT THE HERBS


GARLIC

Most of you will recognize Garlic as the ‘poor man’s penicillin.’ It’s extremely valuable for fighting bacteria and helps boost the immune system by stimulating white blood cell production.

GINGER

Highly anti-inflammatory, Ginger also helps to soothe nausea.

TURMERIC

Another anti-inflammatory herb, Turmeric is often used to help support the body when dealing with coughs and colds.

ROSEMARY

Rosemary is uplifting and helps to relieve pain and ease headaches. It’s also a circulatory stimulant.

THYME

Thyme is rich in immune-enhancing antioxidants and can be helpful for fighting infection.

CAYENNE

A warming herb that stimulates digestive enzymes and circulation, Cayenne is good for general aches and pains. It also contains capsaicin, which tells the brain to release the ‘happy hormones’ known as endorphins.

Enjoy your remedy-making!
Much love,
Erin

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO ADD TO YOUR FIRE CIDER?
Let us know in the comments below.

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Erin Stewart is an herbalist, NAHA certified aromatherapist, organic gardener and urban homesteader. She grows over 150 kinds of aromatic and medicinal plants for her own apothecary and distills essential oils and hydrosols in her PNW garden. Erin is the founder of Floranella and of AromaCulture’s herbalism + aromatherapy magazine.

Want to learn more about herbalism and aromatherapy?

AromaCulture Magazine is filled with educational articles, case studies and recipes written by practicing herbalists and certified aromatherapists. New issues are published each month and issues are available individually or via subscription. Visit www.aromaculture.com for more information.

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3 thoughts on “How to Make Fire Cider”

    1. Erin Stewart

      Most people make a fresh batch every year and make enough to last them through the year. I store mine in the fridge. I’ve heard some companies recommend up to 18 months.

  1. This is awesome. I loved the video and can’t wait to see more videos from you. I’m going to forward this along to my Mom, as well. She loves herbal remedies, so she’d love this!

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